Tag Archives: miRNA

Interacting small RNA pathways in worms 1: Introduction

A cluster of new papers, in the journals Cell and Science, discuss the links between piRNAs and various endogenous siRNA pathways in the nematode worm C. elegans. Emerging from these experiments is a picture of a genome-wide surveillance system capable of differentiating between self and non-self nucleic acids. The commonalities and differences between these papers require rather detailed analyses. I’m therefore intending to write a series of posts; first covering some of the background information on these small RNA systems and then getting onto the new findings.

A panoply of small RNA molecules, involved in diverse cellular functions have been discovered in the wake of the initial observation of RNA interference (RNAi). Originally RNAi described the mechanism by which genes could be specifically silenced by the exogenous application of cognate double-stranded RNAs. Nowadays, the term RNAi is more generally applied to gene silencing pathways involving the three major classes of small RNAs; microRNAs (miRNAs), small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs), and piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). A common feature of all these small RNAs is that they complex with members of the Argonaute (AGO) family of proteins. Embedded within AGOs, the small RNAs act as guides; base-pairing with specific target RNAs that can then be cleaved by the RNase H endoribonuclease activity of the AGO protein. However, not all argonautes act by this ‘slicing’ activity; gene silencing can also be achieved by interactions with pathways involved in chromatin modification, or the inhibition of transcriptional elongation. Meanwhile the list of non-silencing roles of AGOs and their complexed small RNAs continues to grow; chromosome segregation, double-strand break repair, programmed genomic rearrangement etc.

The synthesis of both miRNAs and siRNAs generally involves the recognition of dsRNA and its cleavage by Dicer enzymes. miRNAs are derived from short stem-loop structures found in transcripts. siRNAs are the main effectors of the ‘classical’ RNAi. Exogenous dsRNA molecules are cleaved by Dicer into 20-30nt siRNAs that are loaded onto AGOs. However, this pathway also targets endogenously formed dsRNA, which can derive from hairpin structures in transcripts, or by base-pairing between transcripts produced either from separate loci, or by bidirectional transcription at individual loci. Hence, endogenous siRNAs generally target transposons or other repetitive sequences, but can target genes as well.

This basic siRNA pathway is present in most animals, but more complicated systems exist in plants, fungi and nematode worms. These ‘secondary siRNA’ systems wrest on the use of RNA dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) to amplify siRNAs against targets recognised by primary siRNAs. In the cases of plants and fungi the dsRNAs produced by RdRPs are again processed by Dicer enzymes and then loaded onto AGOs. However, various populations of RdRP-produced siRNAs in C. elegans do not require Dicer cleavage.

As noted above, the key effectors of these small RNA pathways are argonaute proteins. The numbers of AGOs present in organisms varies widely. The Drosophila genome encodes 5 AGOs; 3 of these are involved in the piRNA system, whilst the other two specialise in either miRNAs or siRNAs. In contrast, C. elegans has 27 AGOs. This reflects the presence of various additional networks of endogenous- siRNAs. Deep sequencing in C. elegans has revealed a large diversity of different varieties of small RNAs, with major peaks at 21, 22, and 26 nt. Different types of sRNAs have different biases in relation to their predominant 5′ residue, 3′ modifications, and extent of 5′ phosphorylation.

This series of posts will ignore many classes of C. elegans siRNAs and instead concentrate on two varieties of 22nt endo-siRNAs with 5′ guanosine residues (22G-RNAs). 22G-RNAs associated with the AGO CSR-1 have been shown to play critical roles in chromosome segregation during meiosis and mitosis. Another population of 22G-RNAs that associate with various worm-specific AGOs (WAGOs) have been implicated in the long-term silencing of transposons and other genomic loci. The piRNAs of worms – 21U-RNAs – display some critical differences with those found in Drosophila and mammals. However, understanding their role in C. elegans may help to explain some of the outstanding questions about their functions thoughout animals.

Ketting RF (2011). The many faces of RNAi. Developmental cell, 20 (2), 148-61 PMID: 21316584

See also these related posts:
small silencing RNAs. I: Piwi-interacting RNAs.
RNAi and Chromatin Modification
Lamarckian inheritance of antiviral response in Nematodes.
Double-strand break interacting RNAs (diRNAs)

A dual purpose RNA and Hox regulation

A new paper in Plos Genetics shows that a long non-coding RNA regulates the expression of a Hox gene in Drosophila in cis. This finding suggests an explanation for the co-linearity displayed by Hox genes between genomic arrangement and expression pattern.

The Ultrabithorax mutant.

Hox genes are master-regulators of positional identity along the anterior-posterior axis throughout bilaterian animals. Hox genes are found in genomic clusters in which their 3′-5′ organisation mirrors their expression pattern along the A-P axis. This correspondence between body axis and genomic organisation is termed co-linearity. An important feature of Hox gene genetics is the phenomenon of ‘posterior prevalence’. In any given segment the gene that has it’s most anterior boundary of expression in that segment will define segmental identity. Hence, if that gene is not expressed the segment will take on a more anterior identity. Perhaps the clearest example of this phenomenon is the Ultrabithorax mutant in Drosophila, in which segments that would have generated abdominal structures instead take on a thoracic fate, leading to flies with two sets of wings.

The Hox gene cluster is actually divided into two partial clusters in Drosophila; the Antennapedia complex (ANT-C) and the Bithorax complex (BX-C). BX-C consists of three Hox genes responsible for posterior patterning in Drosophila, Ultrabithorax (Ubx), abdominal-A (abd-A), and Abdominal-B (Abd-B) spread over ~300kb, and has become a paradigm for the understanding on genetic regulation. Many transcriptional enhancers, maintenance elements (sites for the binding of Polycomb-group and Trithorax-group chromatin modulating complexes), and encoded microRNAs responsible for regulating the expression of the BX-C genes have been discovered. However, a complete picture of BX-C regulation is still far away. It’s been known since the 1980’s that much of BX-C is transcribed, but the significance of this finding is just emerging. Gummalla et al. have used classical genetics to characterise the role of one such non-coding RNA in relation to the expression of abd-A in the embryonic CNS.

Figure showing the expression of ABD-A (red), and ABD-B (green) in the embryonic CNS. Note the gap in PS13, that isn’t filled by derepressed ABD-A in this mutant.

abd-A is expressed in the embryonic epidermis and CNS in parasegments (PS) 7-12 but is excluded from PS13. In line with ‘posterior prevalence’, this was considered to be due to Abd-B repressing abd-A expression. A mutation that removes Abd-B, shows expression of abd-A expression extending into PS13. However, this mutation also removed some of the sequence downstream of the transcription unit of Abd-B. In flies homozygous for more subtle mutations affecting Abd-B, abd-A expression only spreads into PS13 epidermis and not the CNS.  Therefore, some function located in the genomic region downstream of Abd-B (termed iab-8), was necessary for abd-A repression in the PS13 CNS. Gumalla et al. knew that a long non-coding RNA (iab-8 ncRNA) was predicted to initiate in this area, and therefore set out to characterise it’s function.

A map of the abdominal half of the bithorax complex. the iab-8 ncRNA is shown in blue (note exon structure). Abd-B, and abd-A are in black and the position of the miR-iab-8 is shown.

iab-8 ncRNA is transcribed from virtually the entire region between Abd-B and abd-A, spanning 92kb. Mutations that truncate iab-8 ncRNA near the Abd-B end cause a derepression of abd-A expression in the PS13 CNS, but mutations affecting the end nearest abd-A display only subtle derepression. The difference between these two classes of mutants, appears to be the position of a microRNA encoded by iab-8 ncRNA, miR-iab-8. This suggested that miR-iab-8 was responsible for the repression of abd-A in PS13 CNS. However, mutants with this miRNA deleted did not display the complete derepression phenotype, rather a very weak derepression of abd-A. This showed that there must be a second, partially redundant function of iab-8 ncRNA, apart from producing miR-iab-8.

To test whether a second miRNA or a small polypeptide encoded by iab-8 ncRNA was responsible for this second function, Gummalla et al. missexpressed iab-8 ncRNA from another locus in PS 8-13. This had no effect on ABD-A expression, suggesting that no other trans-acting factor is encoded by the ncRNA. They then performed some complicated genetic experiments that showed that iab-8 ncRNA acts to repress abd-A is cis. They generated flies that contained a deletion of miR-iab-8 on one chromosome, and a truncated copy of the iab-8 ncRNA on the other. These flies do not produce any of the miRNA, but still produce the ncRNA on one chromosome, and yet abd-A is derepressed in PS13 CNS. When flies are generated with one copy of the BX-C deleted, and a deletion of miR-iab-8 on the other chromosome, abd-A is not derepressed.

The iab-8 ncRNA therefore acts to repress abd-A expression in CNS of PS13 through two different mechanisms: a trans-acting miRNA, and through a cis-acting process of transcriptional interference. Although it is possible that this process of cis-repression could act by iab-8 ncRNA recruiting gene silencing machinery that would act by heterochromatin formation or DNA methylation, the authors suggest that it is more likely that iab-8 ncRNA acts by somehow interfering with the abd-A promoter. This leads them to suggest that if this method of gene regulation was widely used within Hox clusters it could explain the link between posterior prevalence and co-linearity. In this case expression of a more anterior gene is blocked in posterior segments by a more ‘posterior’ transcript. Similarly an upstream ncRNA acts to repress Ubx (Petruk et al.2006). This method of transcriptional interference by readthrough of more posterior genes or by upstream ncRNAs would fix the arrangement of Hox genes in an ancestral cluster, and hence the co-linearity that is observed today.

Gummalla, M., Maeda, R., Castro Alvarez, J., Gyurkovics, H., Singari, S., Edwards, K., Karch, F., & Bender, W. (2012). abd-A Regulation by the iab-8 Noncoding RNA PLoS Genetics, 8 (5) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1002720