The CSR-1 siRNA pathway gets more enigmatic

A recent paper forces a reappraisal of the role of CSR-1 its associated 22G-RNAs, and demonstrates a positive regulatory role for this RNAi pathway in C. elegans.

As described in a previous post, depletion of the Argonaute protein CSR-1, or the proteins responsible for the biogenesis of the endo-siRNAs with which its complexes (the RdRP EGO-1, and the helicase DRH-3), results in defective mitotic chromosome segregation and sterility. To explain these findings Claycomb et al. proposed that the CSR-1 22G-RNA pathway acted to organise the proper compaction of the holocentric chromosomes of C. elegans, and the assembly of the kinetochores necessary for their proper segregation. (I strongly recommend reading the earlier post describing this paper’s findings).

Claycomb et al. had found that expression of most genes targeted by CSR-1 associated 22G-RNAs was not significantly altered in csr-1 mutants. Avgousti et al. went back over the same data and found that, although this was true in the main, expression of most of the genes encoding histone proteins was downregulated in csr-1 mutants. It had previously been shown that downregulation of just one histone gene could cause chromosome segregation and sterility phenotypes in worms. This lead Avgousti et al. to hypothesise that the defects seen in csr-1, ego-1 and drh-3 mutants may be caused by defective histone production, rather than the model proposed by Claycomb et al.

Histone proteins make up the core of the nucleosome and are multiply encoded in all eukaryotic genomes. Histone mRNAs are processed in a special way; generally their 3’UTRs are not polyadenylated; instead, downstream of a conserved stem-loop structure, a histone specific sequence (HDE) is recognised and cleaved by the U7 snRNA (an important splicing factor). Both HDE sequences and the U7 snRNA are not present in C. elegans. Avgousti et al therefore tested whether this key histone mRNA processing stage was instead being mediated by CSR-1 and its associated endo-siRNAs in worms.

Using a synthetic oligonucleotide identical to the region of the 3’UTR downstream of the stem-loop from the histone 2A pre-mRNA, they demonstrated that CSR-1 directly binds histone mRNAs. This binding was abrogated upon RNAi depletion of the RdRP EGO-1, showing that CSR-1 binding was dependent on the 22G-RNAs generated by EGO-1. Avgousti et al. also demonstrated that upon knockdown of CSR-1 or EGO-1, or in drh-3 mutants, unprocessed histone pre-mRNAs accumulate, whilst processed histone mRNAs and proteins are depleted.

The strongest evidence supporting the hypothesis that defective histone mRNA processing causes the defects seen in csr-1 mutants was a series of transgenic rescue experiments. Histone overexpression from transgenes, designed to not require 3’UTR mRNA cleavage, was able to counteract the effects of csr-1 or ego-1 RNAi knockdown, whereas transgenes that did required 3’UTR processing could not.

It seems likely therefore that in C. elegans the 3’UTR cleavage of histone pre-mRNAs is performed by CSR-1/22G-RNA complexes. CSR-1 has been shown to possess endonuclease ‘slicer’ activity, but although a likely candidate, it is too early to say whether it directly performs the cleavage or recruits other factors to perform the reaction. I think this paper blows a large hole in the model proposed by Claycomb et al. to explain the role of CSR-1 22G-RNAs; suggesting that the observed chromosome segregation defects are indirectly caused by a failure to produce adequate histones, rather than a failure to direct the organisation of mitotic chromosomes. However, the hypothesis certainly requires further and more subtle experiments. The paper also further muddies the waters on the question of just what the CSR-1 22G-RNA system is doing in most cases. The recognition of histone mRNA 3’UTRs can only account for a very small proportion of this endo-siRNA population. As discussed in other posts the CSR-1 22G-RNA system is the prime candidate to be an epigenetic licensing anti-silencing pathway. Do the two different CSR-1 isoforms perform two different functions; one licensing transcription and the other replacing the U7 snRNA splicing apparatus? Is this pre-mRNA splicing role confined to histone mRNAs? An important first of this paper is the demonstration of a positive role in regulating gene expression for an RNAi system. Generally, the various RNAi pathways negatively regulate gene expression; either resulting in slicing and degradation of transcripts, directing silencing chromatin modifications etc. In this case mRNA processing by the CSR-1 endo-siRNA system leads to proper expression of histones at key periods of rapid cell division (eg. early embryogenesis). Personally, I’m looking forward to more contentious interpretations of this pathway from the research groups involved!

Avgousti DC, Palani S, Sherman Y, & Grishok A (2012). CSR-1 RNAi pathway positively regulates histone expression in C. elegans. The EMBO journal PMID: 22863779

Claycomb JM, Batista PJ, Pang KM, Gu W, Vasale JJ, van Wolfswinkel JC, Chaves DA, Shirayama M, Mitani S, Ketting RF, Conte D Jr, & Mello CC (2009). The Argonaute CSR-1 and its 22G-RNA cofactors are required for holocentric chromosome segregation. Cell, 139 (1), 123-34 PMID: 19804758

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